Car-Jacking

Car-Jacking

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) defines carjacking as the attempted or completed robbery of a motor vehicle by a stranger that includes the use or threat of use of force. According to a DOJ report released in March 1999, between 1992 and 1996 there were an average of 49,000 carjackings each year, up from earlier estimates of about 35,000 each year during the period 1987 to 1992. Earlier reports put carjacking at about 2 percent of all motor vehicle thefts.

The latest report shows that carjackings grew from 3 percent of all motor vehicle thefts in 1992 to 3.5 percent in 1996. From 1992 to 1996, in about half of all carjackings the motor vehicle was stolen. In about 90 percent of completed carjackings, weapons were used and in about 70 percent of those carjackings the weapon was a firearm. However, most carjackings did not result in injuries to the victim--only 23 percent of completed carjackings and 10 percent of attempts resulted in injuries.

The great majority (92 percent) of all carjacking incidents involved a lone victim; men were more likely to be the victim of carjackings; and urban residents were more likely than suburban or rural residents to be carjacked. Thirty-five percent of completed carjackings were reported to insurers. The DOJ says that most of the carjacking victims said they either had no theft coverage or did not report the theft to their insurers.

Further, completed carjackings were less likely than thefts to be reported to insurance companies. A study by the Illinois State Police covering 1994 to 1996 found that most of the 45 carjackings it studied were gang-related. Sixty percent of those involved had known gang affiliations. Their primary motivation appeared to be a need for short-term transportation. The Anti-Car Theft Act, designed to reduce the number of car thefts nationwide and make armed auto theft ("carjacking") a federal crime, became law in 1992. In 1994, the passage of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act made carjacking where death results a federal crime punishable by death.

Car-jacking is nothing more than stealing a car by threat or use of force. Like any other crook, the car-jacker is looking for the easiest target. Some of the things you can do to reduce your chances of becoming a victim are:

  • When approaching your car, be aware of your surroundings. If suspicious persons are near your car, walk past and go back to a safe area.
  • Have your keys ready when you get in your car, to avoid fumbling in a strange parking lot.
  • If the car is unexpectedly unlocked or open, do not get in. Call for help.
  • Once in your car, lock all doors and close all windows.
  • If approached by a stranger after you are in your car, do not open a door or window, drive away, and sound your horn if you feel threatened.
  • While driving, avoid areas that concern you. Keep your car in good repair and full of gas.
  • Allow room to maneuver between you and the vehicle in front of you. Do not open doors or windows for strangers.
  • If someone attempts to stop you, or causes an accident where you do not believe it is safe to stop, drive to an area you feel safe, such as an occupied gas station, police station, etc.

If an unmarked police car attempts to stop you and you are not sure it is a police officer, obey all traffic signals, signal to the officer your intentions and drive to an area you believe it is safe to stop, such as an open convenience store, police station, etc.


CAR JACKING - stealing a car by force - has captured headlines across the country. Statistically, your chances of being a CAR JACKING victim are very slim, and preventative actions can reduce the risk even more.

If the car jacker has a weapon, give up your car with no questions asked. Your life is worth more than your car.

Keep your car doors locked and windows closed at all times while you are in your vehicle.

Be especially alert at gas stations, shopping malls, convenience and grocery stores, and intersections - all are likely spots for car jackers.

Park in well-lighted areas with good visibility, close to walkways, stores and people.

Approach you car with the key in your hand. Look around your car before getting in, especially underneath the car. And make sure there is no one hiding inside of the car before entering.

If your car is stolen, report it to the police immediately. The sooner the police are notified, the better your chances of recovering your vehicle.


CARJACKING
What you can do to protect yourself! - Arlington County Va Police Dept

Before You Go

  • Select a safe route. Well lit and well traveled streets are generally safest.
  • Have an alternate route in mind in case of problems.
  • Keep your vehicle in good repair and be aware of your fuel level, always keep your tank at least half full.
  • Travel with a friend when possible - a person alone is more vulnerable.
  • Keep doors locked and windows up.
  • Keep valuables out of view.
  • Keep your car key separate from your house keys.
  • Don't leave vehicle registration, mail, bills or other items with your home address in the vehicle.

Getting There

  • Be aware of activity around you, especially people on foot near your vehicle.
  • Be suspicious of people approaching your vehicle for change, directions, handing out flyers, etc.
  • If someone asks for assistance (stalled vehicle, etc.) do not get out of your vehicle. Go to a safe location and call the police.
  • Travel in the lane closest to the center of the road whenever legally possible.
  • Leave plenty of room between your vehicle and other vehicles to allow yourself a way out.

Upon Arrival

  • Park in well lit and well traveled areas.
  • Look around for suspicious persons and possible hiding places (darkened Doorways, etc.) before turning off your engine.
  • If in doubt, Do Not get out of your vehicle. Drive away and park someplace else. Report any suspicious activity to police immediately.
  • Lock your car and take your keys with you - even for brief errands.
  • Be especially cautious when using automated teller machines.

Returning To Your Vehicle

  • Be aware of persons loitering near your vehicle.
  • Be aware of any tampering which may have been done to your parked vehicle.
  • If you think your vehicle has been tampered with, Do Not get in it. Notify police immediately.

If You Become A Victim...
We strongly caution that resisting or attempting to flee may place you in great danger. Your personal safety - not the potential loss of property - must always remain the primary concern! In many cases the robber has displayed or threatened the use of a firearm and therefore may have the ability to inflict serious injury or death. Submission and surrender of the property is usually the most reasonable course of action.


About Car Jacking

Car Jacking is the taking of a motor vehicle in the possession of another by means of force or fear. Security conscious drivers are less likely to be a victim of car jacking than those who are careless. The crimes can take place at any time but more often take place at night, and are committed by young males. Top spots for car jacking include intersections and the parking lots at malls, apartments, businesses and schools. No matter where you are, you are always at risk.

The following precautions will greatly reduce your chances of being victimized:

Getting In

  • Reduce your chances of being carjacked by walking with purpose, and stay alert.
  • Approach your car with the key in hand. Look around and inside the car before getting in.

Getting Out

  • Park in well-lighted areas, near sidewalks or walkways. Avoid parking near dumpsters, woods, large vans or trucks, or anything else that limits your visibility.
  • Never leave valuables in plain view even if the car is locked. Put them in the trunk or out of sight.

When on the Road

  • Keep doors locked and windows rolled up, no matter how short the distance or how safe the area.
  • Look around, especially at places where you slow down or stop, such as garages and parking lots, intersections, self-serve gas stations and car washes, highway entry and exit ramps, and ATMs.
  • When coming to a stop, leave enough room to maneuver around other cars, especially if you sense trouble and need to get away.
  • Avoid driving alone, if possible. Travel with someone, especially at night.
  • Don't stop to assist a stranger whose car has broken down. Help instead by driving to the nearest phone and calling police to help.
  • Always keep your car well maintained, and make sure you have plenty of gas.

If It Happens To You

  • If the carjacker threatens you with a gun or other weapon, give up your car. Don't argue. Your life is worth more than a car.
  • Get away as quickly as possible.
  • Contact the police immediately.

Remember - Don't argue. Your life is worth more than a car.

As you browsed 'Car-Jacking' you may find interest in following articles . . .

Comments

MY CAR WAS TAKEN 4/30/2008 MY GRANDSON WAS EATING CHIC-FILLET,SEATBELTED IN THE BACK SEAT WHEN SOMEONE REACHED IN THE CRACKED WINDOW OF MY VEHICLE, UNLOCKED THE DOOR ANDPROCEDED TO JUMP IN AND DRIVE OFF NOT KNOWING THERE WAS A VERY BRAVE NINE YEAR OLD IN THE CAR , UNTIL HE HEARD THE DOOR OPEN RIGHT BEFORE HE GASSED ON TO THE HIGHWAY . MY GRANDSON UNBELTED, SLID ACROSS TO THE UNCHILD PROOF DOOR AND JUMPED OUT OF A MOVING VEHICLE HE JUST HAC A CAST TAKEN OFF LEG FOUR DAYS PRIOR, ROLLING ACROSS THE PAEMENT MY SON CAUGHT UP TO HIM. GOD IS SO GOOD TO HAVE ANGELS OVER MY CHILDREN, THEY ARE NOT REPLACEABLE. I AM ELDERLY AND DISABLED AND MY TEN THOUSAND DOLLAR CAR AND MY PURSE(UNSAFETY DEPOSIT BOX) VALUE OF EASILY OVER FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS IN MONEY, JEWELRY(FAMILY AER LOOMS WHERE IN THE CAR . I CANT REPLACE MATERIAL STUFF SO IM SO NOT ANGRY SEEKING REVENGE OR SUCH. JUST WANT THE IDIOT TO KNOW THAT MY GRANDSON WAS SMART TO GET AWAY FROM YOU SAFELY, WHAT IF IT WERE ACHILD ,SIBLING, ECT OF YOURS?

One night I was driving in my local area with a couple friends in another car in front of me. They stopped and pulled over on a residential street and so I did too. We were waiting for another friend to catch up to us when a blacked out suburban rolled slowly down the street towards us. There was a parked car in front of my friends car in front of me so the suburban blocked both him and I in. I backed up to get out but the SUV continued to stay next to me giving my friend in front a clear shot at getting away. 3 Guys jumped out of the SUV and surrounded my car and I hadn't even realized that my window was down. I went to shoot the gap between the Suburban and the parked car but the other driver anticipated my move and blocked me off. So once again I proceeded to back up and try and open the gap back up and luckily this time it had worked perfectly. As i pulled away one guy had reached his arm in my window and grabbed me but he couldn't hold on. Another guy smashed my rear window with a bat or pipe of some sort and that was all that had came out of it Fortunately for me I was driving a sports car that i had just recently purchased so getting away was fast enough to leave them in the dust. LUCKY ME!

I was driving home alone in the evening just after it got dark and a young woman jumped out in the lane in front of my car waiving at me to stop. I stopped not knowing what else I could do. She approached my car as if asking for directions and then attempted to get in my back seat. The second I realized she was going for the handle I drove off. I'm not sure if she was going to car jack me or if she was out of sorts and perhaps drunk or high, but it was very strange and scary. The strangest thing to me is that she looked harmless but I guess the message to me was to be suspicious of anyone when you are driving - common sense to most, I guess I was a bit naive to think she was just asking for directions... Now I know.

My daughter and I were getting ready to start our busy day, (in Michigan). I just had been tellilng her to pay attention to her surroundings, just as i finshed my sentence, there had been a black man standing on the other side of my car, asking for the keys. We, my daughter and I panned the area, and saw no one. Then I started to put the key in the door and there he was. I thought it was a terrible nightmare, he had been there waiting until we came out...

Terrible. this yesterday morning at 6am.
All that I can say is God Is Good ALL the time.
Thank for giving me this time to vent...
Stay safe, everyone.

I was running errands in a strip mall. I finished shopping at one store and drove to the grocery store at the other end of the mall. It was a little after dark. As I was pulling in to the spot, I noticed a man walking towards my minivan. Before I could lock the car doors, the man threw open the back passenger door and tried to jump in. A child's car seat in the back passenger side and some items on the floor kept him from getting in completely. I screamed at him to get out of my car at the top of my lungs. He looked stunned, got out, and hurried off. I thank God that my children were not in the car.

I called the police immediately. This was a busy parking lot that evening. I was stunned that no one came to my assistance, asked if I was ok, called the police, or offered being a witness. I made eye contact with several people after the event, but I should have verbally asked for help. I am guessing at least 6 people had seen what had happened and I'm sure more had heard me scream.

When talking with the police, a man matching my description had just tried to pass a faulty check at a nearby store.

I have had a gang of what i think are kids on my block trying to steal my car several times now. I called the police on them, and now they are putting gang marks on my home since my car was because my car was parked in front of my home. I have 2 way radar paging and I think it's caused them to be confrontational and upset that I called the police. I gotta move now. This article was excellent and explained why I am having so many attempted car robberies and I have a VERY GOOD ALARM TOO! If you have Toyota or Honda, stay away from living near PORTS or BORDERS!

Well this isn't really anything compared to these other comments but here it is. So me and mydad just finish watching a movie on netflix and I go upstairs to my room to change and go to bed. I look out my window and I see a man walk away from my minivan, enter his car, and drive away. I swear he wa testing the handle on the door to see if it was unlocked. I told my dad and he notified the cops and reported a suspicious man. The worst thing is that not long someone did the same thing but the door was not locked and they stole something. Now I'm here in my bed writing this on my iPod...

Post new comment